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What's Happening in IHPC

News & Events

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Public Seminars


Here is a list of the public seminars IHPC is organizing.

Upcoming Seminars


  • Tools, Techniques and Models for Planning Support Across Different Time Horizons

  • Walter Schottky, Pioneer of Semiconductor Physics

  • Structure and reactivity of metal nanoparticles



  • Tools, Techniques and Models for Planning Support Across Different Time Horizons (05th 2014f June 2014)

    Seminar Title:

    Tools, Techniques and Models for Planning Support Across Different = Time Horizons

    Speaker:

    Professor Michael Batty

    Date&Time:

    5 Jun 2014, Thur, 3:00 PM =AD 4:00 PM (followed by refreshment at 4:00 PM)

    Venue

    Exploration Theatrette, 30 Biopolis Street, Level 4 Matrix, Singapo= re 138671

    http= s://www.bsf.a-star.edu.sg/facility/directory.htm

    Organiser :

    Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR

    Singapore Land Authority

    Abstract:

    In this talk, Prof. Michael Batty will introduce a series of models= that are useful for exploring various scenarios pertaining to testing the i= mpact of both large and small infrastructure projects ranging from new high speed railways in London, flooding due to climate ch= ange all the way to more detailed more spontaneous changes in local travel p= atterns due to new bikes schemes and large scale urban redevelopments. Examp= les of models and scenarios will be based on applications to London, and the focus will be on examining man= y changes to large cities which range all the way from short term disruption= s to very long term changes in urban structure. The key message of this semi= nar will be on how different types of model and method combined with different kinds of data ranging from new= forms of big data to traditional sources are changing what we can do with r= espect to different kinds of routine as well as strategic planning, with pla= nning now beginning to focus on many different time horizons from those that pertain to disruptive changes= which occurs over minutes and hours which pertain to making cities smart to= changes that occur of years that pertain to much deeper structural change.

    Biography:

    Michael Batty is Bartlett Professor of Planning at University Colle= ge London where he is Chair of the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CAS= A). From 1990 to 1995, he was Director of the NSF National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCGIA) in the Sta= te University of New York at Buffalo. From 1979 until 1990, he was Professor= of City and Regional Planning in the University of Wales at Cardiff where h= e acted as the Dean of the School of Environmental Design (1983-1986) and Head of the Department (1985-1989) . His early career was as an Assistant Lecturer at the University of Manches= ter (1966-1969) and as a Research Assistant, Lecturer, then Reader at the Un= iversity of Reading (1969-1979). He has held several visiting appointments in computing, engineering, plann= ing, and geography at the Universities of Illinois, Melbourne, Hong Kong, Br= istol, and Michigan. His research work involves the development of computer = models of cities and regions, and he has published many books and articles in this area, His most recent= books are Cities and Complexity (MIT Press, 2007) for which he received the= Alonso Prize of the Regional Science Association in 2011, Virtual Geographi= c Environments (edited with Hui Lin, ESRI Press, 2011), Agent-Based Models of Geographical Systems (edited= with A Heppenstall et al., Springer 2012). In 1999, he was awarded the Sir George Back Award by the Royal Geographical Society for 8Ccontributions to na= tional policy and practice in planning and city design=B9, the Association of Geographic Information Award for Technological Progress (1998) and Association of Geographic Information= Award for for Innovation (2002). Amongst his recent awards are: The Alonso = Memorial Prize, Regional Science Association for Cities and Complexity (MIT Press, 2005); The UCGIS Award f= or Research, 2011-2012; and the Laur=E9at Prix International de G=E9ographie Vau= trin Lud (The Nobel for Geography). He was awarded an Hon DLitt from SUNY Bu= ffalo, 2008. He was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA) in 1982 and made a Fellow of = the British Academy (FBA) in 2001 when he was also elected to the Academy of= Social Sciences (AcSS). He was awarded a CBE in the Queen"s Birthday Honour= s in June 2004 for =8Cservices to geography=B9, and made a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 2009. <= o:p>

     


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    Walter Schottky, Pioneer of Semiconductor Physics (15th 2011f February 2011)

    IHPC Computational Science and Engineering Seminar

    Seminar Title:

    Walter Schottky, Pioneer of Semiconductor Physics

    Speaker:

    Professor Hans-Joachim Queisser

    Date&Time:

    Tuesday, 15 February 2011 at 10.00am

    Venue

    1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis (North wing), Level 15, Seminar Room

    Abstract:

    Walter Schottky, born 1886 in Switzerland, received his education in physics in Germany: obtaining his doctorate with Max Planck in 1912. He was professor at German universities, then joined the Siemens Corporation in Berlin in 1927. His theoretical work improved electronic vacuum tubes; he then concentrated on solid-state physics, defining – for example – the “Schottky defects”. His outstanding contribution was the final interpretation of rectifying semiconductor structures with selenium, copper oxides, lead salts, and eventually silicon. His theory of the “Schottky barrier” thus solved the difficult, long-standing enigma of rectifiers and thereby paved the way for modern semiconductor physics and technology.1 He served as an eminent mentor of solid-state electronics. In his final years, he lived in a refuge in Northern Bavaria, where he died in 1976.2 1 An excellent treatise is: W. Mönch “Electronic Properties of Semiconductor Interfaces”, Springer, Heidelberg (2004) 2 For a review of life and achievements, see: H. J. Queisser, Siemens F&E Berichte (1987), a special issue in commemorations of W. Schottky.

    Biography:

    Hans-Joachim Queisser, born 1931 in Berlin, was one of the Founding Directors of the Institute; he retired in 1998. Queisser is a semiconductor physicist. He studied in Berlin, Lawrence (Kansas, USA) and in Göttingen, where he received his Ph.D. in 1958 in experimental solid-state physics. In 1959, he joined Shockley´s Transistor Corporation and worked in the old apricot barn in Mountain View, California - which was the very cradle of silicon valley. His research concerned defects and perfection of silicon single crystals, device principles, p-n junctions, and solar cells. From 1966, he then investigated compound semiconductors at Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, NJ with emphasis on optoelectronics. He became professor of physics at Frankfurt´s Goethe University in 1966. In 1969, he was asked to help establish the Stuttgart institute. Queisser maintains strong international ties; he was visitor at Stanford, UC Berkley, the National University of Singapore, the Central Research Labs of Hewlett Packard in Palo Alto, CA, Bell Labs, and Sony Corp. at Yokohama, Japan. He was president of the German Physical Society, sat 13 years on the Senate of the Max-Planck-Society and serves on many industrial boards.

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    Structure and reactivity of metal nanoparticles (16th 2011f February 2011)

    IHPC Computational Science and Engineering Seminar

    Seminar Title:

    Structure and reactivity of metal nanoparticles

    Speaker:

    Prof. Notker Rösch, Department Chemie and Catalysis Research Center, Technische Universität München, Germany

    Date&Time:

    Wednesday, 16 February 2011 at 2.00pm

    Venue

    1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis (North wing), Level 15, Seminar Room

    Abstract:

    Properties of transition metal nanoparticles vary significantly with size and shape, a well known example of quantum size effects. From density functional calculations on the adsorption of CO probe molecules at Pd nanocrystallites, we concluded that mainly the size-dependence of lattice parameters affects the adsorption properties of nanoparticles in the scalable regime. The average Pd-Pd distance in nanoclusters of about hundred atoms is ~3% shorter than in Pd bulk. This results in a weaker adsorption compared to an extended Pd(111) surface. On going to smaller Pd clusters, to the non-scalable regime, the CO adsorption energy becomes even smaller, down to species of about 40 atoms. Below that size range the adsorption energy increases again rather significantly. This behavior can be rationalized by a second trend in the non-scalable regime. We also report on a study of scaling properties with respect to a crucial element of technique, namely different exchange-correlation functionals: LDA, GGA, and MGGA. While the geometries of the clusters are reproduced within the expected trends, the energetics turned out to show variations among the functional groups. Finally, we address the so-called “ligand-free” catalysis where palladium particles are used in the synthesis of fine chemicals, e.g. in Heck coupling. A study of CO adsorption at high coverage offers insights into the controversy whether catalytic reactions occur on the surface of metal particles or after metal “leaching” in solution.

    Biography:

    Prof. Notker Rösch is Director of Catalysis Research Center and a Professor in the Department of Chemistry at TU München. He has over 400 publications and is a fellow of the Royal Society. His research interests are the quantum chemical investigations of the electronic structure of complex systems by means of density functional methods. The development of electronic structure methods and their application to large molecules, metal clusters, cluster compounds as well as the studies of adsorption and catalysis at surfaces belong to the research focus of the group. Homo- and heterogeneous catalysis is explored with density functional methods using the Software package ParaGauss developed in his group. This includes the investigation of chemical processes on solid surfaces like the behavior of adsorbates at metal and oxide surfaces as well as in zeolite cavities. The aim is to create a deeper understanding of reaction mechanisms of catalytic processes at the atomic level, to give support for improvements in catalysis interpretation of experiments in the size range up to about 10 nm and for the synthesis of new material.

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    Past Seminars


  • Towards Social Interactive Robotics

  • Multiple Signal Classification Method and Superresolution Imaging

  • Thermoelectric Materials: A Theoretical Perspective

  • Electromagnetic Macromodeling - An Important Field Rich in Opportunities and Potential

  • Perovskites: Electronic Structure, Ferroelectricity and Magnetism

  • Application Performance of a Hybrid MPI/OpenMP Application on Multicore Clusters

  • Laying Parallel Tracks

  • PetaBricks: A Language and Compiler for the Era of Multicores

  • Moving from Grid-based to Node-based Meshless Numerical Methods

  • Silicon photonics: recent results on optoelectronic devices

  • Development of numerical methods for flow with complex geometries



  • Towards Social Interactive Robotics (07th 2010f December 2010)

    IHPC Computational Science and Engineering Seminar

    Seminar Title:

    Towards Social Interactive Robotics

    Speaker:

    Yan Wu

    Date&Time:

    Tuesday, 7 December 2010 at 9.30am

    Venue

    1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis (North wing), Level 15, Seminar Room

    Abstract:

    In recent years, the demand for robots that can interact with humans in a social and dynamically changing environment has been on the rise. Developing adaptive mechanisms for sustainable long-term assistance and interaction is a long standing focus in the domain. At the heart of our work lie the four essential ingredients for developing socially assistive robots, which are to understand, to learn, to interact and to grow with. This talk introduces these key areas of our research, including collaborative learning, intention prediction, lifelong user modelling, social attention modelling and collaborative frameworks for human robot interaction. I will particularly elaborate on our recent development of the hierarchical one-shot imitation learning framework which has been validated statistically and tested on the iCub humanoid robot for playing games with human users.

    Biography:

    Yan Wu received his Bachelor"s Degree in Information and Computer Engineering from the University of Cambridge in 2007. After graduation, he joined the Advanced Computing Programme of Institute of High Performance Computing, Singapore where he was involved in various data mining projects. Since Oct 2008, he is a PhD student in the BiART Lab at Imperial College London on the A*STAR National Science Scholarship. He currently works in the area of biologically-inspired imitation learning in Humanoid Robotics.

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    Multiple Signal Classification Method and Superresolution Imaging (07th 2010f December 2010)

    IHPC Computational Science and Engineering Seminar

    Seminar Title:

    Multiple Signal Classification Method and Superresolution Imaging

    Speaker:

    Associate Professor Xudong Chen, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NUS

    Date&Time:

    Tuesday, 7 December 2010, 3.30 pm

    Venue

    1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis (North wing), Level 15, Seminar room

    Abstract:

    The electromagnetic inverse scattering problem of determining the locations of a collection of small scatterers is investigated. The locations of scatterers are determined by the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) method. Multiple scattering effect is taken into account and the inverse scattering problem is nonlinear. However, the proposed method does not involve iterative evaluations of the corresponding forward scattering problem. In addition, the method provides better imaging resolution than the standard MUSIC does, and applies to degenerate scatterers to which the standard MUSIC does not apply. MUSIC method is a superresolution imaging approach. The role of multiple scattering on superresolution imaging is also discussed.

    Biography:

    Xudong CHEN received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, in 1999 and 2001, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA, in 2005. Since then he joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, and he is currently an Associate Professor. His research interests include mainly electromagnetic inverse problems. He has published more than 50 journal papers on inverse-scattering problems, material parameter retrieval, and optimization algorithms. He visited the University of Paris-SUD 11 in 2010 as an invited visiting Associate Professor. He was the recipient of the Young Scientist Award by the Union Radio-Scientifique Internationale (URSI) in 2010.

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    Thermoelectric Materials: A Theoretical Perspective (09th 2010f December 2010)

    IHPC Computational Science and Engineering Seminar

    Seminar Title:

    Thermoelectric Materials: A Theoretical Perspective

    Speaker:

    Prof. David Joseph Singh, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Date&Time:

    Thursday, 9 December 2010 at 2.00 pm

    Venue

    1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis (North wing), Level 15, Seminar Room

    Abstract:

    Thermoelectric performance depends on combinations of transport properties that do not normally occur in the same material, such as high thermopower in combination with high conductivity and low lattice thermal conductivity in combination with high mobility. While there is no known upper bound on the figure of merit ZT, finding materials with high performance is challenging and requires balancing the properties. This talk presents recent results from first principles and transport calculations that explain the thermoelectric behavior of known materials and point the way towards new materials. Some surprising results are found, such as thermoelectric performance related to being near lattice instability, oxides with extremely anisotropic thermopowers and some new potential oxide thermoelectrics that do not contain cobalt or rhodium. Directions that may be useful in future searches for thermoelectric compositions are suggested with emphasis on high temperature materials for power generation. Aspects of the work described here were supported by the Department of Energy, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, the S3TEC Energy Frontier Research Center and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Propulsion Materials Program.

    Biography:

    David J. Singh is a Corporate Fellow at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where he has been since 2004. Previously, he was head of the Theory of Functional Materials Section at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. He is a graduate of the University of Ottawa, where he received a Ph.D. degree in Physics in 1985. He is a leading expert on methods for first principles calculations and their application to thermoelectric, superconducting, ferroelectric and other classes of materials. He was the recipient of the E.O. Hulbert Science Award in 2003. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and serves on its Publication Oversight Committee. He is an adjunct Professor of Physics at the University of Tennessee and is a frequent visiting Professor at the Universite Paris-Sud (Orsay). Singh is the author of more than 330 refereed scientific publications, which according to ISI have received in aggregate more than 16,000 citations.

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    Electromagnetic Macromodeling - An Important Field Rich in Opportunities and Potential (06th 2010f December 2010)

    IHPC Computational Science and Engineering Seminar

    Seminar Title:

    Electromagnetic Macromodeling - An Important Field Rich in Opportunities and Potential

    Speaker:

    Andreas Cangellaris, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana, USA

    Date&Time:

    Monday, 6 December 2010, 3.00 pm

    Venue

    1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis (North wing), Level 15, Seminar room

    Abstract:

    Over the years the term “macromodeling” has been used in scientific and engineering modeling and simulation to describe a variety of things. In the context of electromagnetic (EM) field modeling and computer-aided EM device/system design, “macromodeling” is widely understood to mean the process through which a compact physical or mathematical model is defined to describe the EM attributes of a portion of the system, the detailed description of which requires a large number of degrees of freedom (state variables) for its modeling. In this context, low-order, EM macromodels have been used extensively for a variety of applications, including the expedient calculation of the broadband response of passive EM devices; the use of domain decomposition techniques for the EM field modeling of electrically-large structures of high complexity; for facilitating numerical solution of hybrid electromagnetic-circuit models; and for inspiring and facilitating multi-domain physical system modeling. In this presentation we review some of the aforementioned applications of EM macromodeling in the context of a unifying framework appropriate for use in conjunction with models obtained either through the discrete approximation of the system of interest using a differential equation-based numerical method or through a direct measurement of the response of the system. This review will help us highlight new opportunities in the interpretation and use of EM macromodeling, and argue its bright potential as a catalyst for advancing the modeling versatility and computational efficiency of state-of-the-art EM computer-aided analysis and design methodologies and tools.

    Biography:

    Andreas Cangellaris is M. E. Van Valkenburg Professor and Departemnt Head in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Professor Cangellaris received his Diploma in Electrical Engineering from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, in 1981, and the MS and PhD degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1983 and 1985. He has spent over twenty years in academia, first at the University of Arizona (1987-1997) and then at the University of Illinois (1997 – to date). Professor Cangellaris’ current teaching and research interests include computational electromagnetics; CAD methodologies and tools for signal and power distribution network design in high-speed/high-frequency electronics; EMI/EMC modeling and simulation; and technqiues for multi-physics modeling and MEMS CAD. He has publihsed over 250 refereed articles in journals and conference proceedings on the aforementioned topics and he has coa-authored the book Multigrid Finite Element Methods for Electromagnetic Field Modeling. He is Fellow of IEEE and serves Editor of the IEEE Press Series on Electromagnetic Field Theory. In 2005 he received the Alexander von Humboldt Research Award from Germany for his contributions to engineering applications of electromagnetic field theory.During 2008-09 he served as Distinguished Micriwave Lecturer for the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society.

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    Perovskites: Electronic Structure, Ferroelectricity and Magnetism (02nd 2010f December 2010)

    IHPC Computational Science and Engineering Seminar

    Seminar Title:

    Perovskites: Electronic Structure, Ferroelectricity and Magnetism

    Speaker:

    Prof. David Joseph Singh, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Date&Time:

    Thursday, 2 December 2010 at 10.00 am

    Venue

    1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis (North wing), Level 16, Training Room

    Abstract:

    Perovskite materials display a wide variety of physically interesting and useful behaviors. One of the key applications is as dielectrics, especially ferroelectrics and relaxor ferroelectrics. These are used in a wide variety of applications, including ceramic capacitors, memory devices, transducers, and microwave systems. The functionality of these materials depends on a delicate balance between different lattice instabilities of the ideal cubic perovskite structure. In this talk I discuss these instabilities from the point of view of first principles calculations and present some new ideas about future directions for finding new ferroelectric compositions with useful properties. This work was supported by the Department of Energy, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

    Biography:

    David J. Singh is a Corporate Fellow at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where he has been since 2004. Previously, he was head of the Theory of Functional Materials Section at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. He is a graduate of the University of Ottawa, where he received a Ph.D. degree in Physics in 1985. He is a leading expert on methods for first principles calculations and their application to thermoelectric, superconducting, ferroelectric and other classes of materials. He was the recipient of the E.O. Hulbert Science Award in 2003. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and serves on its Publication Oversight Committee. He is an adjunct Professor of Physics at the University of Tennessee and is a frequent visiting Professor at the Universite Paris-Sud (Orsay). Singh is the author of more than 330 refereed scientific publications, which according to ISI have received in aggregate more than 16,000 citations.

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    Application Performance of a Hybrid MPI/OpenMP Application on Multicore Clusters (18th 2011f January 2011)

    IHPC Computational Science and Engineering Seminar

    Seminar Title:

    Application Performance of a Hybrid MPI/OpenMP Application on Multicore Clusters

    Speaker:

    Prof David William Walker

    Date&Time:

    Tuesday, 18 Jan 2011 at 10am

    Venue

    1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis (North wing), Level 15, Seminar Room

    Abstract:

    This talk will examine the performance impact of combining shared memory and message passing programming techniques within a single application. This approach has often been suggested as a method for improving the performance of scientific applications on clusters of shared memory or multicore systems. DL_POLY, a large scale Molecular Dynamics application programmed using message passing programming, has been modified to add a layer of shared memory threading and the performance analysed on two multicore clusters. Experimental results show that at lower processor numbers, the extra overheads from shared memory threading in the hybrid code outweigh performance benefits gained over the pure MPI code. On larger core counts the hybrid model performs better than pure MPI, with reduced communication time decreasing the overall runtime. These results are interpreted in terms of the communication profile of the application, the overhead arising from the use of multi-threading, and the communication performance of the interconnect.

    Biography:

    David Walker is Professor of High Performance Computing in the School of Computer Science and Informatics at Cardiff University, where he heads the Distributed Collaborative Computing group. From 2002-2010 he also was Director of the Welsh e-Science Centre. He received a B.A. (Hons) in Mathematics from Jesus College, Cambridge in 1976, an M.Sc. in Astrophysics from Queen Mary College, London, in 1979, and a Ph.D. in Physics from the same institution in 1983. Professor Walker has conducted research into parallel and distributed algorithms and applications for the past 25 years in the UK and USA, and has published over 140 papers on these subjects. Professor Walker played a leading role in initiating and guiding the development of the MPI specification for message-passing, and has co-authored a book on MPI. He also contributed to the ScaLAPACK library for parallel numerical linear algebra computations. Professor Walker’s research interests include software environments for distributed scientific computing, problem-solving environments and portals, and parallel applications and algorithms. Professor Walker serves on the editorial boards of Concurrency and Computation: Practice and Experience, The International Journal of High Performance Computing Applications, and Computer Physics Communications.

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    Laying Parallel Tracks (04th 2011f January 2011)

    IHPC Computational Science and Engineering Seminar

    Seminar Title:

    Laying Parallel Tracks

    Speaker:

    Dr Victor Luchangco

    Date&Time:

    Tuesday, 4 Jan 2011 @ 3pm

    Venue

    1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis (North wing), Level 15, Seminar Room

    Abstract:

    Multicore computers require parallel program to exploit their potential. But the current state of the practice of parallel programming is too difficult and error-prone for "everyday programming": despite over forty years of experience, any but the most trivial concurrency and synchronization is typically the domain of expert programmers, and even they often get it wrong. We need new ways to think about concurrent programming, emphasizing data structures and algorithms that are fundamentally parallelizable, and new tools--languages, synchronization constructs, etc.--to exploit the available parallelism, and to reason about and manage the resulting programs. In this talk, I"ll discuss some ways in which I think programs and how programmers think about them will need to change, and present some examples using the Fortress programming language, a new language we are developing at Oracle Labs.

    Biography:

    Victor Luchangco works in the Scalable Synchronization and Programming Languages Research Groups at Oracle Labs. His research focuses on developing algorithms and mechanisms to support concurrent programming on shared-memory multiprocessors. He is also involved in the design of the Fortress programming language, a new language aimed at scientific computing. Although a theoretician by disposition and training, Victor believes that systems must address the practical concerns of programmers; he would like to design systems that people can actually use. Because concurrent programming is notoriously difficult and error-prone, he is also interested in exploring how to simplify reasoning about concurrent systems, both by changing how people design and think about these systems, and by using tools to aid in formal verification. Victor received an ScD in Computer Science from MIT, with a dissertation on models for weakly consistent memories.

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    PetaBricks: A Language and Compiler for the Era of Multicores (11th 2011f January 2011)

    IHPC Computational Science and Engineering Seminar

    Seminar Title:

    PetaBricks: A Language and Compiler for the Era of Multicores

    Speaker:

    Prof Saman Amarasinghe

    Date&Time:

    Tuesday, 11 January 2011 at 3.30pm

    Venue:

    1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis (North wing), Level 16, Training Room

    Host in IHPC:

     

    Abstract:

    For the last four decades, a byproduct of Moore"s Law has been the continuous and dramatic increase in the performance of sequential applications. Unfortunately, in the current and future generations of processors, doubling the number of transistors is not leading to any increase in sequential performance due to power and complexity issues.
    Thus, all major processor vendors are moving towards multicore processors. While architects have known how to build parallel processors for over a half a century, the main stumbling block for their wider acceptance has been the difficulty in programming them. In the first part of the talk I will discuss the path to multicores, address why parallel programming has been such a difficult problem to solve and speculate on our ability to crack it this time around.

    One promising approach to parallel programming is the use of novel programming language techniques -- ones that reduce the burden on the programmers, while simultaneously increasing the compiler"s ability to get good parallel performance. In the second part of the talk, I will introduce PetaBricks, a new implicitly parallel language and compiler where having multiple implementations of multiple algorithms to solve a problem is the natural way of programming. The PetaBricks compiler autotunes programs by making the best fine-grained algorithmic choices. Choices also include different automatic parallelization techniques, data distributions, algorithmic parameters, transformations, and blocking. I will also introduce an online autotuner for PetaBricks that can speedup programs even when half the processing resources are used for autotuning.

    Biography:

    Saman P. Amarasinghe is a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). Currently he leads the Commit compiler group and was the co-leader of the MIT Raw architecture project. Under Saman"s guidance, the Commit group developed the StreamIt language and compiler for the streaming domain, Superword Level Parallelism for multimedia extensions, DynamoRIO dynamic instrumentation system, Program Shepherding to protect programs against external attacks, and Convergent Scheduling and Meta Optimization that uses machine learning techniques to simplify the design and improve the quality of compiler optimization. His research interests are in discovering novel approaches to improve the performance of modern computer systems and make them more secure without unduly increasing the complexity faced by either the end users, application developers, compiler writers, or computer architects. Saman was also the founder of Determina Corporation, which productized Program Shepherding. Saman received his BS in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from Cornell University in 1988, and his MSEE and Ph.D from Stanford University in 1990 and 1997, respectively.

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    Moving from Grid-based to Node-based Meshless Numerical Methods (30th 2010f November 2010)

    IHPC Computational Science and Engineering Seminar

    Seminar Title:

    Moving from Grid-based to Node-based Meshless Numerical Methods

    Speaker:

    Professor Zhizhang (David) Chen, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Dalhousie University Halifax, Canada

    Date&Time:

    Tuesday, 30 November 2010, 3.00 pm

    Venue

    1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis (North wing), Level 16, Training Room

    Abstract:

    Recent research has showed the method of weighted residuals (MWR) can be used as a framework that unifies most of numerical methods developed so far; differences among the different numerical methods lie in selection of different equations to be solved, different basis and weighting functions. Based on this new development, in this talk, we will present evolution of conventional grid-based techniques to node-based meshless methods, the challenges and progress associated with them. Numerical examples verify the effectiveness and validity of the methods in modeling fine geometry and curved boundaries/interfaces. Future work in this direction will also be discussed.

    Biography:

    Dr. Chen received a M.A.Sc. degree in Radio Engineering from Southeast University, Nanjing, P. R. of China, and a Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Ottawa, Canada, respectively. He was appointed as a Killam Chair Professor in Wireless Technology at Dalhousie University from 2005 to 2010. He received the Association of Professional Engineers of Nova Scotia (APENS) 2005 Engineering Award, a 2006 Dalhousie graduate teaching excellence award, and the 2007 Dalhousie Faculty of Engineering Senior Faculty Research Award. He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

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    Silicon photonics: recent results on optoelectronic devices (15th 2010f December 2010)

    IHPC Computational Science and Engineering Seminar

    Seminar Title:

    Silicon photonics: recent results on optoelectronic devices

    Speaker:

    Dr Laurent Vivien, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institute of Fundamental Electronics - University of Paris-Sud, Orsay, France

    Date&Time:

    Wednesday, 15 December 2010, 2.00 pm - 3.00 pm

    Venue

    1 Fusionopolis Way, Connexis (North wing), Level 16, Training room

    Abstract:

    Silicon-based photonics have generated a growing interest with impressive results on passive and active devices in the last years. The main applications are optical communications, optical interconnects in microelectronic circuits and biosensing. One of the rationales of the used of silicon photonics is the reduction of photonic system cost thanks to the high density integration of silicon devices and the used mature technology. Furthermore, the integration of photonic components and an electronic integrated circuit (EIC) on a common chip can also enhance the integrated chip performances. During this seminar, I will present an overview of our activities on silicon photonics for the definition of high speed optical link. I will mainly focus the seminar on high speed silicon-based optical modulators and germanium photodetectors integrated in silicon-on-insulator waveguide and also on the possible ways to integrate photonic and electronic in the same circuit.

    Biography:

    Dr Laurent Vivien received his Ph.D. degree in physics on nonlinear optical properties of carbon nanotubes for optical limiting. Since 2003 he has joined the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) at the Institute of Fundamental Electronics (IEF) – University of Paris-Sud, Orsay, France. The activities of Laurent Vivien are about silicon-based photonics from the passive to optoelectronic devices. He also developed a new activity on the potentialities of Carbon nanotubes for photonics. The main applications are optical interconnects, optical fiber communications and biophotonics. Since 2006, he leads the silicon photonics group at IEF (http://silicon-photonics.ief.u-psud.fr/). Dr. Laurent Vivien is currently involved in several Regional, National and European projects as coordinator, workpackage or task leader. He has published more than 100 papers in international journals and more than 100 communications in national and international conferences. He also contributed to several books on silicon photonics and he is holder of 6 patents. He has also supervised 8 PhD and 4 Post-doc. Since 2008, he received the “French authorization (HDR)” to act as external examiner. Laurent Vivien is one of the main organizers of SPIE Photonics Europe symposiums on silicon photonics and integrated optics since 2008 and was organized three schools on silicon photonics. He is a frequently invited reviewer, monitor or referee for photonics projects by several grant agencies and is member at the National Committee of Scientific Research of CNRS.

    Institute of High Performance Computing
    1 Fusionopolis Way 16-16 Connexis
    Singapore 138632 map


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    Development of numerical methods for flow with complex geometries (11th 2011f January 2011)

     

    Seminar Title:

    Development of numerical methods for flow with complex geometries

    Speaker:

    Professor Xing Zhang

    Date&Time:

    11 Jan 2011, Tuesday @ 10.00am

    Venue

    Seminar Room, Level 15

    Abstract:

    This talk focuses on numerical methods for handling complex and moving boundaries. After a brief introduction to the research background, I will present some progresses made by our research group in the following three directions: unstructured grid method, Chimera grid method and immersed boundary method. For the unstructured grid method, a staggered scheme for incompressible flow on tetrahedral mesh is proposed. This scheme discretely conserves vorticity and kinetic energy. For the Chimera grid method, I will present a modified pressure-correction scheme which is valid on unstructured overset meshes. Two topics related to the immersed boundary (IB) method will be discussed in this talk. The first topic is the "smoothing" technique to reduce un-physical oscillations in force prediction. The second one is the implementation of IB method in the framework of discrete stream-function approach. The parallelization and validation of an in-house CFD software based on this variant of IB method are also discussed.

    Biography:

    Professor Xing Zhang graduated from Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 1992 with a bachelor degree in Aerodynamics. He completed a Master of Science in Fluid Mechanics from the Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics in 1995. For the 3 years following the completion of his M.S. degree, he worked in Beijing as a research fellow for the same institute. In 1998, he relocated to Amherst, Massachusetts, USA to pursue graduate study in Mechanical Engineering. Following the completion of his Ph.D. in 2002, he began to work for the Institute of High Performance Computing, Singapore as a postdoctoral research fellow. He joined the Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2004 and is currently an associate professor of the institute. His research interests are numerical algorithms in CFD, turbulence modeling and biolocomotion.

    Institute of High Performance Computing
    1 Fusionopolis Way 16-16 Connexis
    Singapore 138632 map


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